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Gratitude and the benefits of positively paying attention

Gratitude and the benefits of positively paying attention

by Moyra Mackie on February 9, 2018

I’ve been thinking a lot about gratitude this week.

Firstly Jane, a friend of mine from school, nominated me on Facebook to declare three positive things each day for five days and to pass this nomination on to three of my friends.

Now ordinarily I am not a huge fan of the “get me a million likes because I’m seriously ill” or “share this picture of a mis-treated animal to show you care” type of post that Facebook is awash with.

I believe we need to give real time and real money to the causes we care about and spend time with people we know who are suffering, rather than soothe ourselves with an instant LIKE or SHARE.

So that’s the grouchiness out of the way, let’s get back to the gratitude.

Jane’s nomination struck a chord with me

I’ve been buried in books about emotions over the last couple of weeks as the subject of my Masters dissertation is about working with emotions in coaching.

http://www.coachwiththegreenhat.com/gratitude-bene…ying-attention/

All roads to happiness and leadership start with positive emotions

In the Emotional Life of your Brain, the neuroscientist,  Richard Davidson, says:

“Emotion works with cognition in an integrated and seamless way to enable us to navigate the world of relationships, work and spiritual growth.  When positive emotion energizes us, we are better able to concentrate, to figure out the social networks at a new job or new school, to broaden our thinking so we can creatively integrate diverse information, and to sustain our interest in a task so we can persevere.”

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Moyra Mackie

Moyra Mackie

Moyra Mackie helps leaders and teams to work with courage, compassion and creativity. She is an executive coach and consultant and the founder of Mackie Consulting.

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Conflict is fantastic. Discuss.

Conflict is fantastic. Discuss.

by Moyra Mackie on October 27, 2014

Conflict.  What comes to mind when you read that word?  How do you feel about conflict?

Almost every team I’ve ever worked with comes to me asking for help with both uncovering unvoiced conflict and strategies for dealing more effectively with conflict when it arises.

The way we deal with conflict – ignoring it, running away from it, confronting it – is a reflection of our early programming.

We bring our family of origin to work

The way we respond to power and group dynamics are echoes – sometimes very loud ones – of those we find in our family.  Indeed, our notion of leadership and what makes a team will also come from our earliest experiences of power and notions of “fitting in.”

Similarly with conflict.

We learn how to manage conflict by watching how those around us deal with it

Perhaps we had one parent who was quick to verbalise disagreement, who might be quick to anger, acting out strong convictions of being right?  Perhaps our other parent would be the oil on troubled water, quick to agree, eager to bring down the tension?  Or perhaps we had parents of the same type – two “shouters” or two avoiders?

In any of these cases, how many of us were able to witness on a regular basis resolution of difference?  Very often we might see our parents disagree – but what kind of process did they use to come back to a common understanding?

What we don’t understand controls us

Not understanding how to resolve conflict gives the very notion of conflict great power.

“In most organisations, managers and employees have learnt to sweep conflicts under the rug in hopes that they will go away. 

As a result, they have developed cultures that encourage people to NOT fully communicate what they really want and settle for partial solutions or no solutions at all.

Denying the existence of our conflicts does not make them disappear, but simply gives them greater covert power.” ~ “Resolving Conflicts at Work” Kenneth Cloke & Joan Goldsmith

I like to use the image of a bucket.  Every time we don’t speak openly – to either raise a point of disagreement or recognition – a drop falls into the bucket.  In no time at all, that bucket fills up and it’s only when it overflows, that the problem is acknowledged.
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Moyra Mackie

Moyra Mackie

Moyra Mackie helps leaders and teams to work with courage, compassion and creativity. She is an executive coach and consultant and the founder of Mackie Consulting.

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The most important hour in every manager’s day

The most important hour in every manager’s day

by Moyra Mackie on July 26, 2014

Do you manage a team but feel you never have time for everything you have to do?

Are you concerned that your team doesn’t really seem to be a cohesive, aligned team?

Do you have someone in your team who just doesn’t seem to “get it”?

Did you know that there’s a  really simple solution to address these and most other managerial challenges?

Have regular one to ones with every one of your team

Yes really, it’s that simple. If you’re a manager you should be spending an hour a week with all your direct reports.

Surely one to ones can’t solve all my managerial headaches?

If done properly – and we’ll come to that later – your one to ones are precious moments to:

If all of those things are being nurtured on a weekly basis, most of your managerial headaches will subside.  And those that don’t, can usually be helped by making sure YOU have regular one to ones with YOUR boss.

But an hour a week! Does it really have to be that often?

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Moyra Mackie

Moyra Mackie

Moyra Mackie helps leaders and teams to work with courage, compassion and creativity. She is an executive coach and consultant and the founder of Mackie Consulting.

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Enough creativity for today, now get back to work.

Enough creativity for today, now get back to work.

by Guest Contributor Adam Billing on July 12, 2014

In 2012, a very revealing study was conducted by the folks at Adobe to get a sense of how important global executives thought creativity was for business. The study also asked how good or bad they believed they were at this creativity thing.

The survey sample size was n=5000, with around n=1000 respondents each from the US, UK, Germany, France and Japan.

Creativity is critical to growth

Across geographies, around 80% or more agreed that “creative potential is critical for economic growth”, and around half of all respondents felt that they were “increasingly being expected to think creatively at work”.

However, only around 25% of those surveyed believed that they were “living up to their creative potential” – and between 75-80% felt that there is “increasing pressure to be productive rather than creative at work.”

So what does this tell us?

At the risk of oversimplifying things, it means that people are increasingly aware of the importance of being creative at work, but are getting very mixed signals about what that actually means. They are being told that they need to think more creatively, but that being productive is much more important.

Creativity vs productivity

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Guest Contributor Adam Billing

Guest Contributor Adam Billing

Adam is the founder and Director of Bridge Collaboration; specialising in collaborative design, innovation, design thinking and cross-boundary collaboration.

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